The Russian Constructivists

Constructivism: Russian art movement in which assorted (usually mechanical or industrial) objects are combined into non-representational and mobile structural forms.

The constructivists were a nonobjective art movement that began in Russia and had far reaching effects on modern art.

It encompassed architecture, painting, sculpture, ceramics, clothing and textile design. An early name for it was production art, and one of its aims was to revolutionize industrial design by creating a body of artist-engineers

  

It first appeared in the work of Vladimir Tatlin around 1913, as a development of Cubist relief constructions, and was first called Tatlinism. Itís theorists did not name it Constructivism or fully establish itís principles until 1921. Others who found prominence in the movement included Iakov, Chernikhov, and Alexander Rodchenko.

Constructivist work utilized materials such as iron, wood, glass and plaster in an attempt to bridge the gap between everyday life and art.

An early name for it was production art, and one of itís aims was to revolutionize industrial design by creating a body of artist-engineers.